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in on regular conference calls with the white house. they're among the leaders the obama administration is turning to for advice on everything from the deficit to taxes to the broader economy. >>> then, after we talk to them, they're going to paint a picture for us, we're going to turn to two powerful investors for insight into what the conversation in washington means for the broader markets. cowen and company ceo jeff solomon will join us, and the bond king, bill gross. first, steve will bring us up to speed on the morning's top stories. steve? >> thank you, michelle. disney posting better than expected earnings and revenues after the bell. the company says it expects the next few quarters to be better on a stronger lineup of films and growing attendance at its theme parks. ceo bob iegory was on cnbc's "closing bell." >> you had a lot of ins and outs. basically, the trendser good. we had strong results at our domestic parks. the bookings have been pretty solid. advertising was okay. and generally speaking, our business performed well. and our interactive media group was profitable for
spending. we promise. we will do it. and they both agreed to do this. now it was a -- obama is not asking to do targeted spending cuts. he's asking to do a deficit reduction package. >> it has moved. >> it has moved. and the u.s. -- >> we talked clearly about it and -- >> and you ask the people in the u.s., what about sequester? i just want to see that we can cut spending. the reason we -- >> it's symbolic at this point. >> it is. it's only 44 billion by tend of the year. >> i would agree. i would think that if you hadn't looked at what you had done over the last couple of months where it had been partisan politics and where republicans feel like they got the short end of the stick, you might be able to do a better deal right now. but every time one side feels like it's lost, it has to come back and make up ground. >> government has grown 20% over the last four years. we're trying to cut it marginally. >> but you know as well as i do, it's discretionary spending that's the big problem. >> but there's still hundreds of billions of dollars in discretionary spending. but there's 200 billion
resumed. boston 4i9 with two feet with snow. the governor ordering schools to remain closed. the obama administration declaring a state of emergency in connecticut which will help them get federal moneys for the cleanup. they saw record snow, over three feet. schools there also remaining closed today. we've got some updated outage numbers. some of the figures we had from the weather an hour ago, particularly in rhode island, significantly underreported. here are the new numbers that we have. only 135,000 customers still without power across the northeast. majority in massachusetts, over 110,000. that's down from about 400,000. so they've worked really quickly there. in rhode island the number is now 20,000 down from peak of around 70,000 over the weekend. close to 1400 still in the new york area. and over 200 in connecticut. but that connecticut number might also be higher. the numbers well below hurricane sandy overall. ford's head of u.s. sales says the auto dealer doesn't see any major impacts like they saw during sandy due to the snowstorm. during sandy they lost nearly 200,000 car
when obama came in. 47 million now. that's more than the population of spain, 47 million. we all want to help people that are needy. but it's probably not a good idea to create and add to the people that are needy and then feel virtuous about helping them. if policies were able to take -- the 16 million back off food stamps that are on now by giving them jobs, by instituting policies that give them jobs to where they're -- i mean it's so good to feel good on the front end about being virtuous about helping people that are needy but what if you're adding to all the people that are actually in need, steve? >> one statistic that summarizes it, sequester. everybody's talking about the sequester. if "the wall street journal" pointed out, the amount of money we're talking about for one year on the sequester's cuts is one-third of one percent of the 3.6 trillion that we would have if we had a budget. but that's the number. we can't -- one-third of one percent of our budget? oh, my god! if anybody thinks we're going to give those young people a chance that says it all. >> it would be nice if
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